Nobel Prizes 2013

Live Reuters photos, video, and analysis of the the 2013 Nobel Prizes in medicine, physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and economics.

  • On this day in 1901, the first Nobel Prizes were awarded.

    7 unbelievable ways past winners found out they won: huff.to/19qtw7a
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  • The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons accepts the Nobel Peace Prize

    King Harald and his wife Queen Sonja of Norway attend the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo December 10, 2013. The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), a Hague-based global chemical weapons watchdog, working to eliminate chemical arms stockpiles around the battlefields of Syria's civil war, won the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize in October. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz
    Ahmet Uzumcu (L), director general of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) delivers a speech during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo December 10, 2013.  REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 
    Nobel Peace Prize committee head Thorbjoern Jagland (L) applauds Ahmet Uzumcu, director general of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo December 10, 2013. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz  
    King Harald (2L) and his wife Queen Sonja (L) of Norway stand with Ahmet Uzumcu (3L), director general of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Nobel Peace Prize committee head Thorbjoern Jagland (4L) and other committee members during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo December 10, 2013. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz 
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  • Reuters Graphic: Chart and timeline showing breakdown of past Nobel Economic Sciences Prize laureates by country of origin. Includes details of the winner of the 2013 prize.

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  • Reuters journalists Niklas Pollard and Johan Ahlander report: Three American scientists won the 2013 economics Nobel prize on Monday for research that has improved the forecasting of asset prices in the long term and helped the emergence of index funds in stock markets, the award-giving body said.

    "There is no way to predict the price of stocks and bonds over the next few days or weeks," The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in awarding the 8 million crown ($1.25 million) prize to Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller.

    "But it is quite possible to foresee the broad course of these prices over longer periods, such as the next three to five years. These findings ... were made and analyzed by this year’s Laureates," the academy said.

    The behavior of asset prices are key to decisions such as savings, house buying and national economic policy, the academy said.

    "Mispricing of assets may contribute to financial crises and, as the recent global recession illustrates, such crises can damage the overall economy," it added.

    The economics prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, was established in 1968. It was not part of the original group of awards set out in dynamite tycoon Nobel's 1895 will.

    (Reporting by Niklas Pollard and Johan Ahlander; Editing by Alistair Scrutton and Ralph Boulton)
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner edited by Margarita Noriega (Reuters) 10/14/2013 7:59:09 PM
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  • Announcement of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences announced by Staffan Normark, Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. At the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sessionssalen, Lilla Frescativägen 4A, Stockholm, Sweden. October 14, 2013.

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  • In Photos: The 2013 Nobel Prize in economics announcement 

    Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Torsten Persson (L-R), Per Krusell, Staffan Normark and Per Stromberg announce the winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, October 14, 2013. REUTERS/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency

     
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
    Photos of the 2013 Nobel Prize laureates in Economic Sciences Eugene Fama (L-R), Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller are displayed during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, October 14, 2013. REUTERS/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency 
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
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  • Reuters reporter David Cutler gives a rundown of this year's Nobel prize winners:

    Physiology or Medicine:
    James Rothman (United States)
    Randy Schekman (United States)
    Thomas C. Suedhof (Germany, United States)
    For - plotting how cells transfer vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals to other cells, giving insight into diseases such as Alzheimer's, autism and diabetes.

    Physics:
    Francois Englert (Belgium)
    Peter Higgs (United Kingdom)
    For - predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle that explains how elementary matter attained the mass to form stars and planets.

    Chemistry:
    Martin Karplus (United States, Austria)
    Michael Levitt (United States, United Kingdom)
    Arieh Warshel (United States, Israel)
    For - laying the foundations for development of computers to understand complex chemical processes from the purification of exhaust fumes to photosynthesis, which helps in complex processes such as the development of drugs.

    Literature:
    Alice Munro (Canada)
    For - being a master of the contemporary short story. Munro is acclaimed for her finely tuned storytelling, which is characterized by clarity and psychological realism. Some critics consider her a Canadian Chekhov.

    Peace:
    Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)
    For - its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons.

    Economics:
    Eugene Fama (United States)
    Lars Peter Hansen (United States)
    Robert Shiller (United States)
    For - their empirical analysis of asset prices.

    (Reporting by David Cutler, London Editorial Reference Unit)
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  • Reuters reporter David Cutler gives a look at the 2013 Nobel Prize for economics, which was awarded jointly to Americans Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller "for their empirical analysis of asset prices."

    - Fama, Hansen, and Shiller developed new methods for studying asset prices and used them in their investigations of detailed data on the prices of stocks, bonds and other assets. Their methods have become standard tools in academic research, and their insights provide guidance for the development of theory as well as for professional investment practice.

    - In 1968, the Sveriges Riksbank - Sweden's central bank - established the prize in memory of Alfred Nobel. It is not one of the five awards set out in the dynamite tycoon's will. The prize is worth 8 million crowns ($1.25 million).

    - Since 1969, 45 prizes have been awarded to 74 laureates; Ragnar Frisch from Norway and Dutchman Jan Tinbergen were the first. Of the 44 prizes, 22 were given to one laureate only.

    - The oldest laureate in Economic Sciences to date is Leonid Hurwicz, who was 90 when he won the 2007 prize. He is also the oldest Laureate to be awarded a prize in any of the categories. Elinor Ostrom is the only female winner of the Economics prize so far, in 2009.


    (Reporting by David Cutler, London Editorial Reference Unit)
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  • It is the 6th time the Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded jointly to 3 persons.
    by The Nobel Prize via twitter edited by Margarita Noriega (Reuters) 10/14/2013 11:10:48 AM
  • Three American scientists won the 2013 economics Nobel prize on Monday "for their empirical analysis of asset prices," the award-giving body said.

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences gave the 8 million crown ($1.25 million) prize to Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The economics prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, was established in 1968. It was not part of the original group of awards set out in dynamite tycoon Nobel's 1895 will. Summary by Reuters Niklas Pollard Alistair Scrutton.
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  • The Nobel Prize Committee announces this year's award in economics:

    There is no way to predict the price of stocks and bonds over the next few days or weeks. But it is quite possible to foresee the broad course of these prices over longer periods, such as the next three to five years. These findings, which might seem both surprising and contradictory, were made and analyzed by this year’s Laureates, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller.

    Beginning in the 1960s, Eugene Fama and several collaborators demonstrated that stock prices are extremely difficult to predict in the short run, and that new information is very quickly incorporated into prices. These findings not only had a profound impact on subsequent research but also changed market practice. The emergence of so-called index funds in stock markets all over the world is a prominent example.

    If prices are nearly impossible to predict over days or weeks, then shouldn’t they be even harder to predict over several years? The answer is no, as Robert Shiller discovered in the early 1980s. He found that stock prices fluctuate much more than corporate dividends, and that the ratio of prices to dividends tends to fall when it is high, and to increase when it is low. This pattern holds not only for stocks, but also for bonds and other assets.

    One approach interprets these findings in terms of the response by rational investors to uncertainty in prices. High future returns are then viewed as compensation for holding risky assets during unusually risky times.

    Lars Peter Hansen developed a statistical method that is particularly well suited to testing rational theories of asset pricing. Using this method, Hansen and other researchers have found that modifications of these theories go a long way toward explaining asset prices.

    Another approach focuses on departures from rational investor behavior. So-called behavioral finance takes into account institutional restrictions, such as borrowing limits, which prevent smart investors from trading against any mispricing in the market.

    The Laureates have laid the foundation for the current understanding of asset prices. It relies in part on fluctuations in risk and risk attitudes, and in part on behavioral biases and market frictions. (Source: Nobelprize.org)
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  • Here are the three winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in economics:

    Eugene F. Fama
    U.S. citizen
    Born 1939 in Boston, MA, USA.
    Ph.D. 1964 from University of Chicago, IL, USA.
    Robert R. McCormick Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at University of Chicago, IL, USA.
    www.chicagobooth.edu

    Lars Peter Hansen
    U.S. citizen.
    Born 1952 in USA. Ph.D. 1978 from University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    David Rockefeller Distinguished Service Professor in Economics & Statistics at University of Chicago, IL, USA.
    larspeterhansen.org

    Robert J. Shiller
    U.S. citizen.
    Born 1946 in Detroit, MI, USA.
    Ph.D. 1972 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Boston, MA, USA.
    Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
    www.econ.yale.edu

    Source: Nobel Prize announcement
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  • Robert Shiller, professor of Economics at Yale University, speaks regarding "Why Did Economists Not Predict the Economic Crisis" at the American Economic Association Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, January 5, 2010. REUTERS/Tami Chappell

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  • 2013 Prize in Economic Sciences awarded to: Eugene F. Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller "for their empirical analysis of asset prices." The 2013 Prize in Economic Sciences have laid the foundation for the current understanding of asset prices.

    by The Nobel Prize via twitter edited by Margarita Noriega (Reuters) 10/14/2013 11:00:46 AM
  • Models, Rules And High School Dropouts: A Guide To The Economics Nobel (NPR)

    While a few gamblers bet real money on potential Nobel Prize winners, at Planet Money we're content to merely speculate. The good folks at Thomson Reuters are interested, too. Each year, Reuters publishes a closely watched list of predictions about who might win. Since 2002, this list has successfully predicted the eventual economics laureate(s) five times. This year, it named three groups of economists as favorites:

    - High School Dropouts: Joshua Angrist, David Card and Alan Krueger
    - Rules: Richard A. Posner and Sam Peltzman
    - Models: Sir David Hendry, M. Hashem Pesaran and Peter Phillips

    Continue reading.
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  • Welcome to the final 2013 Nobel Prize announcement! Today the economics prize will be announced at 7:00 am EDT, or 1 pm local time.
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  • Reuters reporters offer a look at the Nobel Peace Prize, which was awarded on Friday to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

    - The OPCW, based in The Hague, is charged with overseeing the destruction of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile in conditions of civil war.

    - The prize is decided by the five-member Norwegian Nobel Committee, led by Thorbjoern Jagland, a former prime minister and the head of the Council of Europe. Committee members are elected by Norway's parliament, and generally come from across the political spectrum.

    - The Committee received 259 valid nominations for the 2013 prize, of which 50 were organisations and the rest individuals.

    - The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded 94 times between 1901 and 2013. The 125 winners comprise 100 individuals and 22 separate organisations, the International Committee of the Red Cross having won the prize three times and the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees twice.

    - Only two peace prizes have been shared between three winners. The 1994 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Yasser Arafat, Shimon Peres and Yitzhak Rabin; and the 2011 prize went to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkol Karman. Yemeni journalist Karman was only 32, and was the youngest ever laureate by 11 days.

    - The oldest winner is Joseph Rotblat, who was 87 years old when he was awarded the prize in 1995. Only 15 women have received the peace prize.

    - The Vietnamese politician Le Duc Tho is the only person to have refused the prize. He was awarded it jointly with U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in 1973 for negotiating the Vietnam peace accord. Kissinger never traveled to Oslo to deliver his acceptance speech.

    - Three laureates were under arrest when they were awarded the prize: German pacifist and journalist Carl von Ossietzky in 1935, Burmese politician Aung San Suu Kyi in 1991 and Chinese human rights activist Liu Xiaobo in 2010.

    - Both Josef Stalin and Adolf Hitler were nominated for the prize - Stalin in 1945 and 1948 for his efforts to end World War Two, and Hitler in 1939, although the nomination was never intended to be taken seriously.

    (Reporting by David Cutler, London Editorial Reference Unit, and Balazs Koranyi; Editing by Kevin Liffey)
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  • On Monday, we will bring you live coverage of the Nobel Prize in economics announcement.
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  • In Photos: Previous winners of the Nobel Peace Prize

    (From L - R) Norway's Nobel Committee chairman Thorbjoern Jagland, European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, and European Parliament President Martin Schulz are pictured with the Nobel diploma during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in Oslo City Hall, Oslo December 10, 2012. REUTERS/Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix /pool

     
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
    2011 Nobel Peace Prize laureates human rights activist Tawakkol Karman of Yemen (L), Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (2nd L) and Liberian peace activist Leymah Gbowee (3rd L), pose for a picture with Sweden's Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt (R) at the Rosenbad government headquarters in Stockholm, December 12, 2011. REUTERS/SCANPIX/Claudio Bresciani 
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner

    Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo is seen in this undated photo released by his family on October 3, 2010. REUTERS/Handout

     
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
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  • This is something that can only happen on social media: a tweet from the official Nobel Prize organization to the OPCW requesting they get in contact. 


    This tweet is a part of world history now. 
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  • Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee Thorbjorn Jagland announces the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize as committee secretary Geir Lundestad listens at the Nobel Institute in Oslo, October 11, 2013. Jagland fields a number of questions from the room, including why Malala Yousafzai was not given the award, and is asked to address concerns that the Committee has a euro-centric view. REUTERS/Heiko Junge/NTB Scanpix

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  • "This is not only about Syria." Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee Thorbjorn Jagland answers questions on the Committee's decision to award the peace prize to OPCW, adding that the organization had been considered for the award in previous years.
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner edited by Margarita Noriega (Reuters) 10/11/2013 9:20:15 AM
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    Official tweets from the Nobel Prize Committee on Friday announcing the OPCW as winner of the Peace Prize for 2013. 
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  • Syrian officials have been constructive and cooperative in the early stages of the program to destroy Syria's chemical weapons arsenal, the head of the global chemical weapons watchdog said on Wednesday. Ahmet Uzumcu, director general of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, said that experts aimed to visit 20 sites in the coming days and weeks, and could eliminate Syria's chemical weapons by mid-2014 if they won support from all sides in its civil war.

    READ: Chemical weapons watchdog says Syria cooperating with mission
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  • The Nobel Committee announces OPCW as the winner of the 2013 peace prize:

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013 is to be awarded to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons.

    During World War One, chemical weapons were used to a considerable degree. The Geneva Convention of 1925 prohibited the use, but not the production or storage, of chemical weapons. During World War Two, chemical means were employed in Hitler’s mass exterminations. Chemical weapons have subsequently been put to use on numerous occasions by both states and terrorists. In 1992-93 a convention was drawn up prohibiting also the production and storage of such weapons. It came into force in 1997. Since then the OPCW has, through inspections, destruction and by other means, sought the implementation of the convention. 189 states have acceded to the convention to date.

    The conventions and the work of the OPCW have defined the use of chemical weapons as a taboo under international law. Recent events in Syria, where chemical weapons have again been put to use, have underlined the need to enhance the efforts to do away with such weapons. Some states are still not members of the OPCW. Certain states have not observed the deadline, which was April 2012, for destroying their chemical weapons. This applies especially to the USA and Russia.

    Disarmament figures prominently in Alfred Nobel’s will. The Norwegian Nobel Committee has through numerous prizes underlined the need to do away with nuclear weapons. By means of the present award to the OPCW, the Committee is seeking to contribute to the elimination of chemical weapons. (Source: Nobelprize.org)
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  • In Photos: OPCW wins 2013 Nobel Peace Prize 

    A U.N. vehicle is seen near a photo of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad at the entrance of a hotel where a team of experts from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) are staying in Damascus, October 8, 2013. REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri  
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
    (L-R) OPCW’s Malik Ellahi, political adviser to Director General Ahmet Uzumcu, External Relations Director and team leader Wang Ju, Declarations Branch head Nihad Alihodzic and Chemical Demilitarisation Branch head Dominique Anelli attend a news conference in The Hague, October 9, 2013. REUTERS/Toussaint Kluiters/United Photos 
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
    OPCW Director General Ahmet Uzumcu speaks during a news conference in The Hague, October 9, 2013. REUTERS/Toussaint Kluiters/United Photos 
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner
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  • OPCW, the United Nations organization overseeing the chemical weapons eradication program in Syria, wins Nobel Peace Prize, reports Reuters Balazs Koranyi:

    The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), which is overseeing the destruction's of Syria's arsenal, won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, the Norwegian Nobel Committee said. Experts from the Hague-based global chemical weapons watchdog, supported by the United Nations, are working to destroy Syria's massive chemical weapons stockpile after a sarin gas strike in the suburbs of Damascus killed more than 1,400 people in August.

    The $1.25 million prize will be presented in Oslo on Dec. 10, the anniversary of the death of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who founded the awards in his 1895 will.

    Norwegian public broadcaster NRK, which has a strong track record leaking the names of winners, reported the OPCW's victory more than an hour before the official announcement.
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  • Photo: Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Director General Ahmet Uzumcu. REUTERS/Toussaint Kluiters/United Photos

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  • Balazs Koranyi reports Norwegian public broadcaster NRK said that the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), which oversees the destruction of Syria's arsenal, will win the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize.

    NRK has a strong track record reporting winners and last year announced that the EU would win an hour before the official statement. Experts from the Hague-based global chemical weapons watchdog, supported by the United Nations, aim to help destroy Syria's chemical weapons production facilities and weapons-filling equipment by November 1. Under a Russian-U.S. deal struck last month, Syria's entire chemicals arms program is due to be eliminated by mid-2014.

    The $1.25 million (£781,445) prize will be presented in Oslo on December 10, the anniversary of the death of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who founded the awards in his 1895 will.

    The OPCW, which has 189 member states, said Syria was cooperating and it could eliminate its chemical weapons by mid-2014, provided they received support from all sides in its civil war.

    Chemical weapons experts believe Syria has roughly 1,000 tons of sarin, mustard and VX nerve gas, some of it stored as bulk raw chemicals and some of it already loaded onto missiles, warheads or rockets. Under a Russian-U.S. deal struck last month, Syria must render useless all production facilities and weapons-filling equipment by November, a process begun over the past several weeks.
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  • Welcome to day five of the Nobel Prizes! Reuters Jonathan Allen writes that Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for campaigning for girl's education, spoke on Thursday of the possibility of winning this year's Nobel Peace Prize and said she might like to be Pakistan's prime minister one day.

    "If I get the Nobel Peace Prize, I think it will be such a great honor, and more than I deserve, and such a great responsibility as well," she told an audience at a New York City cultural center on Thursday night. A win would "help me to begin this campaign for girls' education, but the real goal, the most precious goal that I want to get and for which I am thirsty and I want to struggle hard for, that is the award of seeing every child to go to school," she added.

    READ: Malala Yousafzai speaks of Nobel hopes
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  • So far this week, Nobel prizes have been awarded in four categories - medicine, physics, chemistry, and literature.

    On Monday, James Rothman, 62, geneticist Randy Schekman, 64, and neuroscientist Thomas Suedhof, 57, each received the award for medicine for separately mapping out how cells transfer hormones, brain chemicals, and other vital materials to other cells. “Through their discoveries, Rothman, Schekman, and Suedhof have revealed the exquisitely precise control system for the transport and delivery of cellular cargo,” said the Nobel Assembly in a statement. The scientists’ research could shed light on diseases like Alzheimer’s, autism, and diabetes.

    Peter Higgs and Francois Englert won the Nobel prize in physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle, which explains how elementary matter gained the mass necessary to form stars and planets. The Higgs boson, originally predicted 50 years ago, was finally detected in 2012 at the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

    Wednesday, three scientists were granted the Nobel chemistry prize for their efforts to bring traditional chemical models into cyberspace. Martin Kaplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel broke ground in their work on computer programs that simulate chemical processes and have revolutionized research across the field.

    Canadian author Alice Munro won the Nobel prize in literature on Thursday. The Committee called the 82-year-old the “master of the contemporary short story,” adding that “some critics consider her a Canadian Chekhov.”

    Join us for the much-anticipated Nobel peace prize announcement. The ceremony is slated to begin Friday at 11:00 am local time, or 5:00 am EDT.
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  • Alongside the glory, the Nobel Peace Prize has a darker side likely to make the awards committee think hard before honoring a Pakistani teenage activist shot by the Taliban who is favorite to win on Friday, write Reuters Alister Doyle and Balazs Koranyi.

    The prize has changed the lives of presidents, freedom fighters or humble human rights workers but some winners say it is hard to be put on a lifelong pedestal where actions, flaws and foibles can get judged against a yardstick of sainthood.

    READ: Nobel Peace Prize can pressure winners to be "saintly"
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  • Reuters Live Video: Malala's latest human rights prize earn praise back home

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  • Here are some potential winners for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2013: 

    Photos of Edward Snowden, a contractor at the National Security Agency (NSA), and U.S. President Barack Obama are printed on the front pages of local English and Chinese newspapers in Hong Kong in this illustration photo June 11, 2013. REUTERS/Bobby Yip 
    by Margarita Noriega (Reuters)
    Pakistan's Malala Yousafzai gives a speech after receiving the RAW (Reach All Women) in War Anna Politkovskaya Award at the Southbank Centre in London October 4, 2013. The award is presented to a woman human rights defender from a conflict who stands up for victims at their own personal risk. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor 
    by Margarita Noriega (Reuters)
    Nobel-prize nominated Congolese gynaecologist Denis Mukwege holds a joint news conference with European Parliament vice president Isabelle Durant at the EU Parliament in Brussels November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Yves Herman 
    by Margarita Noriega (Reuters)
    Lyudmila Alexeyeva, human rights activist and one of the founders of the Moscow Helsinki Watch Group, attends a news conference by Grigory Yavlinsky, presidential candidate and one of the leaders of "Yabloko" political party, in Moscow January 16, 2012. REUTERS/Anton Golubev
    by Margarita Noriega (Reuters)
    Pro-Kurdish former lawmaker Leyla Zana gives an address during an election rally in Istanbul, Turkey on July 15, 2007. REUTERS/Osman Orsa 
    by Margarita Noriega (Reuters)
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  • Alice Munro reportedly woke to the news of her win this morning. “I’m amazed and very grateful,” she said in a statement, adding "“I’m particularly glad that winning this award will please so many Canadians. I’m happy , too, that this will bring more attention to Canadian writing.”
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  • Peter Englund, Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy, answers questions about the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature. The interviewer is freelance journalist Ola Larsmo.

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  • Audio of Alice Munro just moments after she found out she won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature.

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  • Peter Englund, permanent secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy, announces the winner of 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature, Canadian Alice Munro at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, October 10, 2013. REUTERS/Anders Wiklund/TT News Agency

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  • In a 2012 interview with the New Yorker, Munro answered questions on Dear Life and her personal history:

    NY: You’ve written so much about young women who feel trapped in marriage and motherhood and cast around for something more to life. You also married very young and had two daughters by the time you were in your mid-twenties. How difficult was it to balance your obligations as a wife and a mother and your ambitions as a writer?

    AM: It wasn’t the housework or the children that dragged me down. I’d done housework all my life. It was the sort of open rule that women who tried to do anything so weird as writing were unseemly and possibly neglectful. I did, however, find friends - other women who joked and read covertly and we had a very good time...

    NY: How did you settle on the short-story form - or did it settle on you?

    AM: For years and years I thought that stories were just practice, till I got time to write a novel. Then I found that they were all I could do, and so I faced that. I suppose that my trying to get so much into stories has been a compensation.


    Read the full interview here.
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  • Recorded video of the announcement of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature

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  • Canadian Alice Munro won the Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday, Reuters Niklas Pollard writes, for finely-tuned story telling that made her what the award-giving committee called the "master of the contemporary short story".

    "Some critics consider her a Canadian Chekhov," the Swedish Academy said in statement on its website as it awarded the prize of 8 million crowns ($1.25 million).

    Munro, 82, started writing stories in her teens. She is mainly known for her short stories and has published many collections over the years. Her works include "The View from Castle Rock" in 2006 and "Too Much Happiness" three years later. "Her texts often feature depictions of everyday but decisive events, epiphanies of a kind, that illuminate the surrounding story and let existential questions appear in a flash of lightning," the Academy said.

    Munro lives in Clinton, not far from her childhood home in southwestern Ontario, Canada.
    In 2009, she revealed that she had undergone coronary bypass surgery and been treated for cancer. She is known to be averse to publicity and rarely gives interviews. The literature prize is the fourth of this year's crop of prizes, which were established in the will of Swedish dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel and awarded for the first time in 1901.
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  • Award winning author Alice Munro gives an interview in 1979, after some Canadian schools ban "The Lives of Girls and Women."

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  • According to the Star, Ladbrokes gaming company had placed 4-1 odds on Munro, the 82-year-old Canadian author, receiving the Prize - behind Haruki Murakami, who was given 5-2 odds. Munro has been granted a number of awards over her career, including the Man Booker Prize, The Commonwealth Writers' Prize, the U.S. National Book Critics Circle Award and others. Her last book, Dear Life, is a collection of stories published in 2012. Munro recently said she will probably give up writing.
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  • An interview with Alice Munro on writing from 2009.

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  • The Swedish Academy has not been able to get a hold of Alice Munro, left a phone message. #NobelPrize #Literature
  • People excitedly welcomed the Nobel Prize in literature awarding Canadian author Alice Munro on Twitter: 











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  • Author Elizabeth Hay (L) holds the Giller Prize, Canada's richest literary award, for her novel "Late Nights On Air" as she is congratulated by fellow Canadian writer Alice Munroe at the end of the Giller awards ceremony in Toronto, November 6, 2007. REUTERS/ Mike Cassese

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  • According to the Nobel Prize website, Alice Munro is only the 13th woman to have been awarded the Literature Prize. Overall, 106 Nobel Prizes in literature have been given since 1901.
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  • An early tweet from the Nobel committee below...
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  • Canadian Alice Munro, 82 yrs old, is awarded the 2013 #NobelPrize in #Literature "master of the contemporary story". http://pbs.twimg.com/media/BWNeTaNCYAAkp0P.jpg

  • Chinese writer Mo Yan won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on October 11, 2012, for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China.

    Mo, who was once so destitute he ate tree bark and weeds to survive, was the first Chinese national to win the $1.2 million literature prize, awarded by the Swedish Academy.

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  • Chairman Sven Lidin (L-R), permanent secretary Staffan Normark and professor Gunnar Karlstrom of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announce the winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm October 9, 2013. Laureates Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel were the winners. REUTERS/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency

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  • Reuters' David Cutler provides more insight into the Nobel chemistry award:

    Here is a look at the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, which was awarded on Wednesday jointly to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel "for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems."

    - Chemical reactions occur at lightning speed; electrons jump between atomic nuclei, hidden from the prying eyes of scientists. The 2013 prize winners in chemistry have made it possible to map the mysterious ways of chemistry by using computers. Detailed knowledge of chemical processes makes it possible to optimize catalysts, drugs and solar cells.

    - 104 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry have been awarded to 162 individuals from 1901-2012. Frederick Sanger won the prize twice. Linus Pauling is the only person to have been awarded two unshared Nobel Prizes, one of which was chemistry in 1954. He was awarded the Peace prize eight years later.

    - Only four are women. Two of the four, Marie Curie and Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, won unshared Chemistry Prizes.

    - Some famous winners include: The Curies were the most successful "Nobel Prize family". The husband-and-wife partnership of Marie Curie and Pierre Curie were awarded the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics. Marie Curie herself won the 1911 chemistry prize. Their daughter Irene Joliot-Curie was awarded the 1935 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, together with her husband, Frederic Joliot.

    - Adolf Hitler forbade two German winners from receiving the Chemistry prize - Richard Kuhn in 1938 and Adolf Butenandt in 1939. (Sources: Reuters, http://nobelprize.org. Chambers Biographical Dictionary.)
    by Danielle Wiener-Bronner edited by Margarita Noriega (Reuters) 10/9/2013 10:27:40 AM
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  • "Theory has become the new experiment," Sven Lindin, Chairman of the committee for the Nobel Prize in chemistry said on Wednesday, remarking on the capacity to use simulations to go beyond classic chemistry and begin to understand chemistry in terms of quantum physics.
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Turkey to let Iraqi Kurds reinforce Kobani as U.S. drops arms to defenders

ANKARA/BEIRUT - Turkey said on Monday it would allow Iraqi Kurdish fighters to reinforce fellow Kurds in the Syrian town of Kobani on Turkey's border, and the United States air-dropped arms to help the Kurds there resist an Islamic State assault. | Video