New York and New Jersey bombings | Reuters.com
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New York and New Jersey bombings

  • JUST IN: Suspect in New York, New Jersey bomb plot charged with five counts of attempted murder - prosecutor's office
  • What more do we know about New York bombing suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami?

    • Rahami, a 28-year-old Afghanistan-born American sought in connection with bombings in New York City and New Jersey, was taken into custody today after a shootout with police, a New Jersey mayor said.
    • Rahami was not listed on U.S. counterterrorism databases, three U.S. officials told Reuters. 
    • He majored in criminal justice at Middlesex County College in Edison, New Jersey, according to the school spokesman. Facebook posts suggest that he went to Columbia High School in NJ.
    • He traveled to Afghanistan several years ago and afterward grew a beard and began wearing religious clothing, according to childhood friend Flee Jones.
    • The reason for the trip and its full impact on Rahami is not known, but Jones said Rahami became more serious and quiet after he returned to the United States.
    • His family was well known in Elizabeth, New Jersey, for frequent skirmishes with neighbors over its fried chicken restaurant, First American Fried Chicken.
    • The family lived above the store, which is wedged between a beauty salon and a shop advertising money transfers and computer help. His father Mohammed Rahami first registered the business in 2006.
    • Elizabeth Mayor Chris Bollwage said that the family filed a lawsuit around 2010, claiming they were being discriminated against. He added that the city's actions involving the restaurant were in no way related to the family's religion or ethnic origin.

    • Suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami has been taken into custody after a gun battle with police.
      by cassandra.garrison





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